Of Feverfew….

As early as the 1700’s, feverfew was used widely in Europe for headaches, as well as for tooth and stomach pains. Feverfew was also used for joint inflammation, especially in the early stages of arthritis. Feverfew was described as “surpassing anything previously used against headaches and as “the aspirin of the 18th century” back in the day….. It is well known to lower fevers and dilate blood vessels to induce sweating. That’s why I keep some in my cupboards for winter illnesses.

Feverfew is used today for the treatment of migraines and accompanying symptoms. It has been known to relieve cramps, relax nerves, and induce a soothing effect on the nervous system. In women’s health it is appreciated for its menstruation-promoting effects and is also used to regulate labor pains to ease the birthing process.

This fragrant herb has similar medicinal abilities like aspirin, and its’ anti-inflammatory properties can help ease the pain of sore muscles, joint pain, and/or arthritis. One of the best ways to use Feverfew for joints and muscles is in a homemade herbal salve in combination with other inflammation herbs. I make mine using feverfew with plantain (Plantago major or P. lanceolata) or lemon balm.

To make feverfew infused oil for salve, mix together four ounces of fresh chopped leaves with one pint of olive or vegetable oil. You can heat this over a medium heat but do not boil (this is probably best done in a double pot if you have one) for one hour. Let the mixture cool and strain, squeezing out as much of the oil as you can. This can be applied to inflamed areas. It can also be turned into a salve by adding between one and one and a half ounces of grated beeswax to warmed oil which should be stirred to blend thoroughly.

To use in tinctures or as a tea, all parts of the leaves or flowering tops can be used either fresh or dried. Fresh young leaves can be added to salads, but sparingly. A dosage of no more than 3 to 5 leaves a day is recommended for treating pain and headaches.

Feverfew has a cumulative effect so it works best when taken in small does over longer periods, especially in treating migraines.  A decoction or infusion of the leaves can be used as a wash for skin lesions and sores.

To make a tincture, fill a pint sized canning jar with fresh or dried feverfew. Cover the plant material with vodka to cover. Put on a lid, shake gently and place in a cool, dark place for 6 to 8 weeks. Shake the jar gently each week. Strain through cheesecloth squeezing the material gently. Place tincture into a new jar. Take 20 drops twice daily for effective treatment.

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